Malvern Rhythm The One To Beat

Author: 
Old Pro
Date Published: 
1976-07-25
Source: 
Tapia
Page: 
12

Malvern vs Robin HoodAction scene from the match between Malvern and Robin Hood.

MALVERN is certainly the team to beat this year, and after their fine performance against Robin Hood football team of Surinam it is a worthy representative for the nation in the current CONCACAF (Confederation of Caribbean and Central American Football Associations) club series.

Malvern showed none of the signs of the debilitating drug rhythm that is so much in evidence in the nation's sport today.

The intake of narcotics, particularly marijuana, is so prevalent among our youth today that output in the sports arena has been inevitably reduced.

One of the effects of drugs is that it produces a lethargic, lifeless, limp movement that passes for "cool".

The rhythm even comes across in speech rhythm and a characteristic phrase is the word "man" pronounced "m-a-a-r-n".

Players even tell you that they play better with a "head" but that's an illusion of course.

At international events the reverse is true: athletes take drugs to speed up their rhythm and that's even more dangerous.

To come back, Malvern showed non of these weaknesses. In fact, the Malvern players combined beautifully for most of the match, and although the match drew goalless, it wasn't for want of shot to goal, particularly, Milton Archibald's roofer which the Robin Hood goalkeeper, Leilis, did well to tip over the bar in the early stages of the first half.

With Texeira at stopper, Archibald, link; Ulric "Buggy" Haynes, forward, Malvern has a trio around whom the team revolves.

And so it was an unfortunate decision by the coach to bring off Buggy about 20 minutes to full-time.

In his absence the forward line's rhythm was thrown out of gear and that at a crucial period, near the climax of the match.

It goes to show that it does not always pay off to make changes during a game. Indeed, the principle in sport "to leave well alone" usually applies.

A fitting commentary on Malvern's performance came from a spectator, who saw the national team's poor showing against the St. Mirren Club of Scotland, that "they should pick the whole Malvern team for the national side."